Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP - Clincial Medical Psychologist & Neuropsychologist
Biopsychosocialspiritual Treatment: More than Just Lip Service
Over the years, it has be extremely frustrating to see treatment options being ignored because of blind spots, dogma indoctrination, and simple lack of knowledge. It is well documented that individuals suffering from some psychiatric conditions tend to have nutritional deficiencies or other physiological factors which lend to the presence of the condition, but many psychologists, psychiatrists and physicians will fail to effectively address these issues. Even though the medications prescribed are dependent on the presence of a balanced base body chemistry to work, the focus tends to be solely on the use of medications and psychotherapy.
These are frustrations:
• lack of understanding and appreciation for the internal experience of the patient suffering from a psychiatric condition,
• lack of knowledge and appreciation for the importance of biological factors impacting psychiatric and medical health,
• the tendency of professionals to read only the literature in their respective fields, 
• an almost dogmatic resistence to any viewpoint other than their own, or the university they graduated from, or outside the norm of their geographic area,
• the lack of attention to the importance of the body eliminating toxins, the need for health of the lymphatic system, methods of improving toxic elimination, and the overall toxic load and the impact on health,
• the limited requirements for training of counselors and therapists compared to the previous decades where two years of focused training in psychotherapy was required,
• the lack of training in various religious and belief systems provided to healthcare professionals.

The spiritual aspect of treatment is also considered by some to be a forbidden zone for anyone except clergy. One of the primary interpersonal relationships in an individual’s life is often the relationship between the person and their Creator. Many individuals may have had an experience which created a “gripe with God” which impacts their lives. Thankfully, the contributions of the recovery community for addictions has reintroduced this relationship.

Regardless of the institutional standards, each professional is morally and ethically required to enhance there knowledge and competency. This puts the onus on each individual provider to accept this challenge.   

Medical Support Staff: Benefit or Destruction of a Professional Practice

Preface:
I am writing this as an attempt to help correct problems which can undermine treatment efforts and the overall function of healthcare clinics.  I hope it is helpful.

Everyone has gone to the physician’s or healthcare provider’s office.  The first contact with the office is frequently via the phone.  From this contact, the patient starts to develop a perception of the level of care. The patient is looking for compassion, sensitivity, understanding of the severity of the problem, a desire to be helpful, and genuine kindness.  This level of professionalism is essential if the patient is to feel that their care is in good hands.  This combination of traits should be the same all the way through the professional care that they receive from the physician or other provider.  It is estimated that 30% of the chances that a patient gets well is depended on if that patient has a good relationship with his/her physician. It is easy to see how poor a patient-physician relationship can impact care.

Recently, I had the opportunity to be reminded of this when my wife was referred to a small clinic who happened to how a CT scanner.  The staff at that clinic met all of the criteria noted above.  This is in contrast to the terse, insensitive attitude demonstrated by all of the support and medical staff (except for a few) at the clinic where my wife is normally seen.  The one receptionist/scheduler of her physician is one of the few excellent professional.  When I attempted to get a post-hospital follow-up appointment which needed to be within 3 to 5 days, a different scheduler answered the phone and told her that it is set for 7 days, despite my life having any appoint on what could be considered the 5 day of my hospital discharge.   This scheduler was terce, insensitive and inflexible giving off an attitude of indifference.   If it were not for the fact that finding a physician willing to follow up on a medication combination which she has been on by necessity for decades, we would be changing clinics.  What is not surprising is that the hospital entity which owns the clinic has, over the past years closed one of their hospital with the their near functioning hospital being in the another State. Also, when we went to their clinic with the CT scanner, more than half the office appeared closed down.  


So what can be done to correct this?  If the problem is a personality issue or a psychodynamic orient, one could try referring them to an Employee Assistance Specialist to see if therapy might help.  If not, replacement of that employee is needed.  Retraining may also be of value. The reality is that if the behaviors do not change, replacement is essential.  It is very possible that the obvious demise of this one hospital entity in this one area of the country may be the result of these details being ignore.

Each of Us Has a Unique Path
My Memories: One Psychologist’s Professional Journey
Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP

During my childhood years, I had the experiences of having a brother who was injured by medical malpractice (missed Rh factor conflict) which resulted in him being mentally impaired and blind.  When I was starting college, I married a young woman with bipolarity. The real life experiences of this and seeing the impact of various conditions on family members and the individuals who suffered from neurological and/or psychiatric conditions was profound.  

I remember when I was in fifth grade I was so terrified of doing pooring in the next, I had my parents by the books for the next grade. I then processed to construct a twenty-five food PERT chart of butcher paper breaking the entire summer vacation into hourly segments to finish all the books and studies by the start of the next year.  This way, I would have completed all the studying for the courses to come.   At that  time, it was seen as unusual.  In retrospect, it was extremely Obsessive Compulsive. I did my first Sociogram when I was in seventh grade to create a "study buddy system."

I remember starting to correspond with Bernard Gunther in the 1960s. I had attended a Sensitivity Group at Portland State University during that time and read his book. Over the years, he become my friend, Master’s Degree advisor, and eventually, God father of my oldest son. He started out as a resident massage specialist at Esalen, becoming an expert in Psychosynthesis, and a student and writer on Eastern methods. Working with a chiropractor, he developed and taught Psycho-Physical-Synthesis, one of the early forms of psychological body work.

I have been privileged to have studied under and worked with several key figures in psychology over the years since 1969. Over the next few posts, I will try to share some of these individuals.  Here are two individuals who I have valued as teachers: Bob Bartholow and Dr. Hans Ansbacher. At the Timberline Lodge conference, I was introduced to Hans and Rowena Ansbacher, as well as key figures in the Adlerian movement.

In 1970, I was taken under the wings of three dedicated professionals: Drs. Aloys & Georgia Daack, and Sister Dominic Bancroft, M.Ed., SP. I miss them all. They were dedicated to both Adlerian Psychotherapy and Montessori Education.  Dr. Aloys Daack was a D.O.  They introduced me to Maurice and Eva Bullard and the world of Adlerian Psychology.

I remember my first introduction to Adlerian psychology at Timberline Lodge ASAP conference where Dr. Mosak presented Life Style Analysis. A few years later, I attended the Alfred Adler Institute of Minnesota where I completed the two additional trainings.

I started my Master's years and ended them with two 15 day retreats in La Jolla with these pioneers in non-directive group process. Facilitators of these programs were Drs. Carl Rogers, Bill Coulson and Bruce Menter. 

In 1973-1974, I had private tutorials with James Wade, M.Ed. in psychological testing as a part of my MA.  Little did I know that Mr. Wade who provided psychological testing to key school districts throughout Portland and was the founder of the Suicide Prevention Program, he was a Clinical Instructor at Oregon Health Sciences University.

How soon we forget.  I had the opportunity to study with and participation in a demonstration with Dr. Kurt Adler, the son of Alfred Adler, M.D.  I encourage you to listen to the wisdom of a master therapist.

I remember attending a five day workshop led by Charlotte Selver and Charles Brooks at Esalen in 1974.  It was an excellent experience and I recommend experiencing this method to all. Toward the end of the one week workshop, I started to become ill and ended up having acupunture treatments and gallons of rose-hip tea.  I felt great after the accupunture session for one day, but then was “sick as a dog.”

In 1974, I had the opportunity to meet and learn from Dr. Harold Greenwald, who had just published his newest book, Direct Decision Therapy (an innovative style of rational emotive therapy).  Over the years, I have used this method as it is presented and in psychodramatic form. He ended up being one of my references for certification as a psychodramatist.

One of the things that is interesting is that when I was in training in psychotherapy, they used reel to reel video tape to record sessions. While studying at the Moreno Institute in Beacon, New York, J.L. died.  His wife, Zerka, took the lead and many of the top psychodramatists around the world helped provide the support and assisted in doing the trainings.  During the first year of my training at the Moreno Institute, many world renowned psychologist/psychodramatists came to see Dr. Moreno and assist Zerka with conducting the trainings because of Dr. Moreno’s illness.  These included Drs. Anne Ancelin Schutzenberger, John Nolte, Elaine Goldman, Larry Sacks, and others.  Since in psychodrama sessions, it is not unusual for cussing to occur, one of the most enjoyable tasks that I and other students had was to teach one of the other students who was from Sweden cuss words.  Some words just don’t have the same impact with an “oo” sound instead of the “u” sound.  Other trainees and psychodramatists-in-training included Ann Hale, Mary Ann Sheridan, John Brindell, Elizabeth White and many others.

Prospective/Preventative Medicine: A Look Back. In the early-1970's, I was involved with the Commonhealth Club in Santa Rosa. Here is a nice summary of an excellent early attempt. 
https://mdedge-files-live.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/files/s3fs-public/jfp-archived-issues/1978-volume_6-7/JFP_1978-03_v6_i3_patient-education-and-multiphasic-screen.pdf

I was just trying to find and get back in touch with Ken Bubb who I worked with at the Commonhealth Club. Unfortunately, like many of my friends, he passed away in 2016.  I will always value those years.

In 1974, I heard of an innovative doctoral program in Clinical Psychology in Santa Barbara (The Fielding Graduate School). After enrolling, I had the pleasure of learning from two of it's founders, Drs. Frederic Hudson, and Hallock Hoffman.

When I was in the Fielding Institute doctoral program back in 1975, my Core Adviser was Clinton Phillips, Ph.D., who was one of the lead figures in the development of Marriage & Family Counseling field.

During the 1980's when I was working in addiction and eating disorders, I had the opportunity to get to know Father Martin and visit Harve de Grace.  I blame him, in part, for some of my bad jokes.

In July of 1993 as part of my doctoral studies, I had the opportunity to attend the World Congress on Neural Networks (July 11-15, 1993, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon).  Two of the presentations were by Dr. Walter Freeman from UC Berkley and Dr. Vilayanur Ramachandran, two profound excellent neuroscientists.  I remember Dr. Freeman and I having a mutual recognition of each other, but we could not place where we know eachother from. Given my multiple adventures/learning experiences in California, I still can not remember.  Many years later, I remember enjoying Dr. Vilayanur Ramachandran presentation on Mirror Neurons. One of the individuals I would have like to have met and talked with was Dr. Donald Hebb. I have used his work extensively which directly relates to the impact of psychotherapy.

During my doctoral program in the early 1990s, I had the privilege to take several trainings with Drs. Ralph Reitan and Deborah Wolfson.  These were held at Georgetown University and were the most informative, well designed trainings I have ever attended.  Over the years, I have found the Reitan Neuropsychological Battery to be the most useful method of neuropsychological assessment.  I was able to augment it with other tools to refine assessments. Given the nature of the types of function based tests, test and retest could reveal improvement or decline in patient performance.  When I combined this with material that I gained from the presentations by Edith Kaplan, Ph.D. regarding process-based assessment, the techniques were even more revealing. 

When I attended the Union Institute and University Graduate Professional Psychology Program, the university was in the process of applying for APA approval.  This put the onus on each faculty member and the learners to make sure that their graduate training went above and beyond the standards.  I was fortunate to have Dr. Larry Ryan, Dean of the program, as my Core Advisor.  My second Core Advisor was Noel Markwell, Ph.D., Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence: Peace Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association.  They inspired me to do a program that most individuals could only dream of doing.  I was also privileged to have Mary Ann Marazzi, Ph.D., Professor at Wayne State and principle researcher in the use of Naltroxine for treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.  After I had completed my Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and Biopsychology, I had the opportunity to co-teach a seminar on neuropsychology with Dr. Ryan in Washington, D.C.

Because I was doing a dual-major (Clinical Psychology and Biopsychology), I had two psychologists who supervised my work, Bruce Bundy, Ph.D. and Marvin Greenbaum, Ph.D., ABPP, and a psychiatrist, Lawrence Sacks, M.D. Dr. Sacks was an excellent (but tough) supervisor with a profound understanding of psychopharmacology and psychiatry.


After attending two short workshops presented by Daniel Amen, M.D., I decided to attend an extensive training in Long Beach on SPECT imaging and psychiatric disorders. While there, I had the opportunity to not only learn to read SPECT imaging and tie in my already existing knowledge of neurobiological aspects of psychiatric conditions, but had the opportunity to meet and talk to Terence McGuire, M.D., a psychiatrist who had been NASA’s psychiatric consultant for manned space activities for 36 years and Chief of Neuropsychiatry at the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine.  Dr. McGuire took the time to review and support my work. I continue to integrate this knowledge in the treatment of patients.

My training in advanced psychopharmacology through Prescribing Psychologists Register provided me with an excellent foundation.  Over the years in training, presenters included John Preston, Ph.D., psychiatrists, and various biomedical scientists.  I had the opportunity to get to know Sam Feldman, Ph.D., the founder of PPR and a good friend.

Because I was one of the first psychologists who was Board Certified in Advanced Psychopharmacology, I became a target of a few medical professionals who opposed the concept of psychologists gaining prescription privileges.  One of the professionals who came to my defense was Joseph Matarazzo, Ph.D., past president of the American Psychological Association (APA), chair of the first medical psychology department in the United States, and has been credited with much of the early work in health psychology.  Ever since I had started studying psychological assessment, I had been reading the master textbooks that Dr. Matarazzo had written. I very much enjoyed meeting him and talking with him.  His support and efforts I will forever be grateful.

One of the problems I had since first grade was what is known as scotopic sensitivity.  Back then (1959), this visual distortion was unknown.  In the 1970s, Helen Irlen, a school psychologist in Long Beach, California discovered this light sensitivity which impacts reading, depth perception and almost all academic tasks.  I took a training in Irlen Syndrome (scotopic sensitivity) to become an Irlen Screener from Susan Hughes, an Irlen Diagnostician.  I was so impressed by this, I then made arrangement to complete the training with Helen Irlen in Long Beach to become a diagnostician. Her significant work and insight into learning disorders and appropriate accommodations continue to influence my work.  I could see that having Irlen Syndrome could profoundly impact not only performance in everyday life, but also the performance on psychological/neuropsychological testing.  Since then, I have written several articles on Irlen Syndrome including one which was published in the Journal of Neurology and Psychology.

When I think of my life experiences prior to and in between these, I see that from my very childhood I was being honed to take on the challenges of being in the field I am in.  From my experiences with my brother who was retarded and blind because of medical malpractice relating to Rh Factor Conflict, to family with various psychiatric conditions, and my knowledge/experience with the impact of neurotoxicity in the world today, I find a passion to reach out and try to make a difference.  I feel very privileged to have met, studied with, and known so many great men and women in psychology and psychiatry over the years.  God willing, I will be able to share this knowledge with the next generation and provide care to my fellow human beings for years to come. 

Activity Analysis Status Questionnaire (AASQ)
One of the key reasons given for denial of disability benefits is the mis-quoting of activity level.  For example, the individual states that "it takes all day to do the laundry," which is interpreted by the administrative law judge as "the person can do laundry all day."  These misinterpretations occur frequently.  I developed the Activity Analysis Status Questionnaire to glean the information to provide specific information on function to help combat this issue.   This form can be used with the individual applying for disability and to gather collateral feedback.




Pain Management Methods Questionnaire (PMMQ)
Over the last two decades, I have watched as we have forgotten all of what we learned in the 1960s and 1970s. The knowledge and practitioners are there, but their utilization for pain management has been ignored. In putting together a pain assessment, it is important that the patient and physician explore all options. Some patients need opioid medications, but each case is unique and needs individualized treatment. There is no "one size fits all."

Below is a questionnaire which can be used to help the physicians, the psychologists, and the patients examine and explore pain treatment options and history:




Short Thought Piece:

I propose the following.  The job of a philosopher, a scientist, and a explorer of life is to consider all options collectively.  We use deductive logic to put together the path of knowledge to be able to draw conclusions. Pattern recognition is both a natural gift and a potentially developed skill. If we use both deductive logic and pattern recognition to put the sources listed below, our development of insight is greater.  This provides a proposed “skeleton” to “flesh out” further theories.

sources of knowledge 
• Learned: knowledge gained from books, lectures or other sources of historical material,
• Observed: knowledge gained through observing the world around us,
• Experienced: knowledge gained through the personal experiences of living,
• Ethereal: knowledge which seems to be present from an unmeasurable source (collective consciousness, intuition, divine inspiration, Akashic records, other),
• Genetic: knowledge that seem to be passed down through, most likely, genetic sources which existed in individual’s genetic line.

Over the years, I have heard the phrase, “the ghost in the machine.” I have also heard that, “the whole is more than the sum of its parts.”  Both of these phrases reflect the elements noted above.  The American psychologist William James encouraged the exploration of the ethereal realm as part of psychological practice, but those who were attempting to justify psychology as a science were unwilling to take a chance of drawing any criticism by including anything that could not be measured.  This mirrored the times of René Descartes when there was a division of science from religion because of political reasons.  The age of fear of reticule needs to end so the age of enlightened exploration can exist.  It is the extension of this exploration which has been done in secret by governments for centuries. It is time for it to come into the light. This is one reason I enjoy Rupert Sheldrake and other explorers of knowledge.


Copyright © 2019, Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP

LETTER SHORT THOUGHT.pdf (PDF — 160 KB)




Sensory Memories & Ghosts of Posttraumatic Stress
Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP

Pretend for a moment that you are in tribal days and you are haunted by ghosts and memories of something horrific.  The tribal medicine man or shaman who finds out about the problem you are having, perform rituals, and exorcises the ghosts.  One technique used by magi and shamans is to have the afflicted party detail the experiences that caused these ghosts, have the individuals create an image or symbol of these event/s, become ready to let go of them, and ritually burn or bury the symbol.  

For a patient with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, there are sensory memories that act as anchors and triggers.  These result in nightmares, intrusive memories and flashbacks.  The odor of diesel reminding the soldier of the heavy equipment during war, the sound of a backfiring car triggering memories of gun fire, or the image of a child just before a bomb explodes are a few of these sensory triggers.  Not all sensory memories of trauma are horrific. Some can be extremely neutral except for the fact that they were present at the time of the trauma.  For example, a vacuum cleaner in the back of a car where a woman died. The process used by ancient healers is very much the same as the ones used today.  The turning point is to identify these sensory memories, express the emotions around them, do whatever one feels needs to occur to become ready to let go of the memory, and then perform the ritual of letting go.  Becoming ready to let go and walking through the steps of making peace with them is the preparation to heal.  What is required to become ready is individualized and can only be defined by that which is written on the individual’s heart.  This does not simply mean desensitizing to the trauma. Various methods of desensitizing sensory memories so that the individual can go through daily life without profound intrusion have been developed. These include flooding, exposure-response modification, eye-movement desensitization (EMDR), and others, but these simply allow the individual to coexist with the ghosts.  It is like learning to live in hell with the trauma without it bothering you.  If treatment stops there, the process of empowerment of the individual may not take place.  It is through the rituals, confronting, making amends or other actions, and traveling the path started by the trauma that we grow and make the experience a useful part of us.  Once we have experienced a trauma or any event in life, it is a part of us.  To try to make it not exist, is like taking part of our childhood or school years disappear.  If we did, we would be the lesser for it.

For those of you trained in psychodrama, you can see how our creativity and imagination can be used to recreate events, provide things we did not have at that point of our life, and create the “rituals” needed to make peace with our experiences.  Sensory memories are recreated and explored. The patient can interact with these memories and experiences, providing corporeal form to that which is without form.  Emotions are expressed through various forms of catharsis. 

It is not unusual for various sensory memories to come back repeatedly throughout our lives. The reason for this is that as we go through each phase of life (i.e., adolescence, young adulthood, becoming parents, becoming grandparents) the events from the trauma may touch us in different ways.  It is not a sign that treatment did not work, but it is the opportunity to deal with a different aspect of our memories.

To be a survivor of trauma is not the end of the path. It is simply one point. When we get to being empowered by the event, this is another point.   We need to stay on the path and see how far we can go.  For some, it may lead to a point you did not believe existed.


Author’s Note: The reasons that I omitted references is that this article is based in total on my forty-four years of experience working with individuals with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.  I simply hope it provides some food for thought for those in the field.


Beyond Trauma
by Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP
Inspired by Gazelle Nicole Richardson (my loving wife)

Once you are able to find your way passed the ghosts and the nightmares,
to that point of strength and power to stand up to the source of the nightmares,
taking back your power and defending that which you could not.

At that point, it is you who have the choice to be kind or be cruel. 
If you choose to hold on to the anger and the pain, you tie yourself to the karmic loop.

If you forgive and let go, you free yourself to move on taking with you the strength that you gained from the ordeal.  

Periodically, you may revisit the ghosts as life phases change and mature,
but it is with the strengths that you have gained to that point.

At some point, we realize that the terms victim and survivor are simply points in a timeline of healing.  If you elect to live at one point in the timeline, it is your choice.  But if you decide to evolve past it to a new point of self, you may find you are more than you ever thought was possible.



Licensed Psychologist, Missouri;
Licensed Psychologist, Oregon; 
Registered Psychologist (Clinical, Counseling & Health) by HCPC, United Kingdom; Board Certified Medical Psychologist, ABMP; Board Certified Psychodramatist/Trainer

I am available for teleconsultations for international cases. I will also be providing psychological services directly as a psychologist at the Greater Ozark Rural Psychologists clinic in Mansfield, Missouri. 

What We Don’t Think About: Vitamin/Mineral Deficiencies, Nature Interaction & Health

Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP

When we are young, we are invincible. 
When we are middle aged, we say “Things are not that bad yet.”
When we get to be 60+, we start to take things seriously.
When we get to be 65, we say “Oh crap!” and worry about our children.

When it comes to health practices, the lines written above appear to be the norm for most individuals.  Some of us remember grandparents and parents trying to get us to take this vitamin or supplement, do this or that healthy thing, or saying “go outside, play in the yard and enjoy the fresh air.”  Once we were old enough to ignore them, we did think that we were invincible.  The world I grew up in of the 1950s and 1960s is not the world we have today.  The level of pollution, depleted nutrients in the foods, rampant vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and electronic smog is higher than it has ever been.  The prose above is what I have found is true for me. Over the last 65 years, the amount of nutrients in our foods have been reduced.  A 2004 study of food nutritional value between 1950 to 1999 showed a statistically significant decline in the medians range, from 6% for protein to 38% for riboflavin.1 This study has been further confirmed by other studies in Europe.2  This is further complicated by the herbicides and pesticides that have, at this point, touched every person in the civilized world, interfering in the metabolizing, absorbing, and retention, of the vitamins and minerals.3    

What about the “go outside, play in the yard, and breath fresh air” command of our parents?   Although some of this was not just for our health, but for our parents sanity, fresh air and being in nature have been proven to be beneficial to health.4 Even people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have been found to benefit from being in contact with nature.5   Health benefits are seen throughout the literature to see for both physical and emotional health.6   But is there more to it than just being in a natural setting?   In the 1960s, there was the revolution of making shoes out of synthetic, insulating materials.  Prior to that, leather (or skin) was used to make shoes.  The leather was a conductive material.  Prior to shoes, we were barefoot.  Like it or not, we are bioelectrical/biochemical entities.  It is not hard to understand that if we have electrical processes within us, we may be impacted by connection with a grounding source, specifically, the earth.  The discovery of connection the with the earth stems back into ancient times, but we rediscovered it thanks to Clint Ober, a retired pioneer in cable television, in 1998.  Since then, the benefits to reduce inflammation, promote healing, and calm emotions, has been documented in multiple peer-reviewed journals, and various case studies.7 8   One of the things I like about the earthing, or grounding approach is that it does not cost anything. You simply have to have bare skin in contact with the earth. Given the number of diseases that impact people’s lives through inflammation, the free treatment option of spending time barefoot outside or working in the garden using your hands in the soil to plant and care for plants would appear to be the best option to give healing a chance. 

How about the play and activity?  Our body has three fluid systems: cerebral spinal fluid, which is a slow leak in and leak out circulation; the vascular system, which includes the heart to pump blood; and the lymphatic system.  The latter has no pump, except for the movement of the human body.  Activity is the way that the fluid circulates.  Besides this, there is a multitude of benefits from “going and playing outside.”  

I also remember my mother giving me iodine tablets to take.  I always thought that it was because of the era we lived in (fear of a nuclear attack), or because I was born in post-war Japan.   Since then, I have research some of the information from the International Association of Oral Medicine and Toxicology, who share the impact of parasites, danger of fluoride on health, and recommend simple things like baking soda instead of toothpaste, iodine for teeth and gums, and using a oral water irrigation.  Perhaps we need to rethink what we have been taught, and start to look at how the older traditional ways seemed to work.  

I have found that studying medical anthropology has improved my understanding of psychology, and medicine because it looks at what worked over many centuries and for thousands of years. It is only recently that we have re-embraced the value of natural honey for health.  I have heard critics talk about these things as “new age,” but in fact, they are practices that we have just forgotten for the “newer and shinier approach.”  To those who state, “I have not heard of any research to support this,” my response is either learn how to read or read more before you express an opinion.

A Native American saying is “Take only what you need, and leave the earth as you found it.”  We have not done this.  We all know that we need to improve our attention to health practices.  As a civilization, we honestly, and intensely, need to change how we treat the earth and our environment.  We need to learn how to find ways of eliminating toxins from our bodies, and provide better support for nutrients, attending to the absorption through probiotics health, reduced inflammation, and making time to reconnect with nature in a way that is more than just watching the Nature Channel.   Don’t wait till you become 60 or older to take these things seriously.  If you do, you will miss out on more life, and may not have the health you want, during the senior years.

1 Davis, D. (2004) Changes in USDA Food Composition Data for 43 Garden Crops, 1950 to 1999. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 23, No. 6, 669–682. http://saveoursoils.com/userfiles/downloads/1351255687-Changes%20in%20USDA%20food%20composition%20data%20for%2043%20garden%20crops,%201950-1999.pdf

2 Davis, D. (2009) Declining Fruit and Vegetable Nutrient Composition: What Is the Evidence? HortScience February 2009 vol. 44 no. 1 15-19. http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/44/1/15.full

3 Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. (2013) Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Interdiscip Toxicol. 2013 Dec; 6(4): 159–184. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3945755/

4 Berman, M. G., Jonides, J., Kaplan, Stephen. (2008). The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature. Psychological Science. 19: 1207-1212. http://libra.msra.cn/Publication/6994981/the-cognitive-benefits-of-interacting-with-nature

5 Kuo, F. E., Taylor, A. F. (2004) A Potential Natural Treatment for Attention-Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder: Evidence From a National Study. American Journal of Public Health. 94(9): 1580-1586. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc1448497/.

6 Ulrich, R. S. (1999). Effects of gardens on health outcomes: Theory and research. In C. Cooper-Marcus & M. Barnes (Eds.), Healing Gardens: Therapeutic Benefits and Design Recommendations. New York: John Wiley, pp. 27-86.

7 Oschman, J., Chevalier, G. & Brown, R. (2015). The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Journal of Inflammation Research. 

8 Ghaly, M. & Teplitz, D. (2004). The Biologic Effects of Grounding the Human Body During Sleep as Measured by Cortisol Levels and Subjective Reporting of Sleep, Pain, and Stress. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Volume 10, Number 5, 2004, pp. 767–776


For arrangements to schedule training programs and workshops, please contact me at drrory@live.com.

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 128
Seymour, Missouri 64746



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Rory Fleming Richardson, Ph.D., ABMP, TEP
Clinical Medical/Health Psychologist & Neuropsychologist



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